washoku

Basics: Japanese soy sauce - all you need to know (and then some)

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I'm still working on getting my sites organized in the background, not to mention my kitchen operational. In the meantime, please enjoy this updated and revised look at Japanese soy sauce. An exhaustive look at Japanese soy sauce. Originally published in December 2011.

Type:  feature Filed under:  basics japanese ingredients washoku

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Back to basics.

Different kinds of umeboshi

This month's Japan Times article is about umeboshi, the sour-salty pickled fruit (usually called a pickled plum, though it's actually more related to an apricot) that's practically a national symbol.

I've written quite a lot about umeboshi on these pages before of course, including how to make your own if you can get a hold of the fresh ume fruit, following my mother's instructions.

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One of the all-time favorites on this site, revised and updated.

Japanese basics: Nanban sauce or vinegar (Nanbansu)

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Three versions of a versatile Japanese sauce that can be used as a marinade, dipping sauce or dressing. It's called Nanban or "wild southern savage" sauce.

Type:  recipe Filed under:  basics japanese sauce yohshoku washoku

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Here's how to cook rice quickly and easily using a regular old non-stick frying pan. It's so easy and foolproof you won't believe it!

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For the last month or so, I've been obsessing about rafute, simmered Okinawan pork belly.

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My latest Japan Times article and recipe are about sakekasu, the lees left over after sake is pressed. Plus: a bonus recipe for amazake, aka "Japanese eggnog".

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How to make fresh mochi, or pounded rice, at home, with ease, and without a mochi making machine.

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A new article in The Japan Times about winter fish, and how fish fits into a typical Japanese meal.

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