japanesecooking101

Japanese Cooking 101: Final thoughts, or what was the point?

I’m still getting reactions to the recently completed Japanese Cooking 101 course (if you missed it, here’s the complete list of lessons.) While the reactions have been overwhelming positive, I’ve gotten a couple of negative comments too.

One I wanted to address in particular is the accusation, if you will, that the lessons do not represent that way most people cook in Japan anymore. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 6: Putting It All Together

Components of a typical Japanese meal

Welcome to the last lesson in Japanese 101: The Fundamentals of Washoku. I hope you’ve enjoyed the course and learned a few things along the way.

In this last lesson we’ll take a look back at what we’ve learned, and also see how to put it all together to great an authentic traditional Japanese meal at home. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 extra: Fish bone crackers (hone-senbei) with shoestring potatoes

jc101-fish3-iwashihone.jpg

There's no need to throw away the bits of fish that you cut off when you filet them and so forth. Fish bones and heads can be kept for making soup. Or, if the bones are tender enough they can be made into delicious fish-bone crackers.

At the sushi restaurant in New York I worked at many years ago, the chefs used to serve these as extra treats to favored customers. One of those was a lovely little girl, who used to come regularly with her father. She just loved those fish bone crackers. So, one year the chefs made a big batch of them and gave her a takeout box full for her birthday. She was so happy I thought her eyes were going to pop out of her head.

I've paired these with shoestring potatoes, which taste surprisingly sweet next to the umami-rich fish bones. The type of potato is important - choose a nice firm waxy type, not a floury type like Idaho baking potatoes. Alternatively you can use sweet potatoes. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 extra: Iwashi no Tsumire-jiru (イワシのつみれ汁) - Sardine balls in clear soup

jc101-fish3-iwashitsumire.jpg

Now that you know how to gut, bone and clean sardines, one of the nicest ways to eat the sardines is to turn them into little fish balls which can be floated in a hot pot, pan-fried, and so on - or most classically, served in a clear soup. The ginger and onion takes away any kind of 'fishy' taste. You can even serve this in cold soup for a refreshing change. (Warning: Not many fish guts below but there is a lot of raw fish!) continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 - Fish, Part 3: How to break down small fish

jc101-fish3-iwashi14.jpg

We are entering the home stretch here for both Lesson 5, Fish and the whole Japanese Cooking 101 course. In this lesson we are going to get very intimate with fish.

Warning to the squeamish: If you find up-close photos of raw fish the way nature made them, with guts and stuff, please do not click through.

I’ve put everything ‘below the fold’ here, so if you want to read the rest please click through to the full article on the site. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 - Fish, Part 1: Salmon Teriyaki

jc101-salmonsaute6.jpg

We are starting Lesson 5, Fish, with an easy bit of salmon cooking. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101: Lesson 5 theme and ingredients revised to - Fish!

jc101-fishdisplay.jpg

I’ve revised the plans for Lesson 5 of Japanese Cooking 101. We’ll be tackling fish! continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 4, Part 2: Prepping Vegetables For Sunomono

jc101-turnipsunomono.jpg

In Part 2 of the sunomono lesson we’ll take a look at some way of prepping the vegetables. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 4, Part 1 : Awase-zu (Vinegar Sauces) For Sunomono

jc101-cucumbesunomono.jpg

This is Lesson 4 of Japanese Cooking 101: The Fundamentals of Washoku. In this lesson we’ll learn how to make the little refreshing side dishes called sunomono (酢の物), which often accompany a Japanese meal. Part 1 is about the various vinegary sauce combinations, called awase-zu. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101: List of fresh ingredients for Lessons 4 (addendum) and 5

Ingredient lists for Lesson 4 (addendum) and Lesson 5 of Japanese Cooking 101. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 3 extra: Nimono without dashi

jc1-1-nimonovar-ikajaga.jpg

Not all nimono dishes need to be made with dashi. If one of the ingredients has plenty of umami on its own, you can make a dashi or broth from it without having to add any more. One such ingredient is squid (ika) or calamari. If you live in an area with a sizeable Italian, Greek or other Mediterranean immigrant population, as well as us Asians, chances are you can get a hold of good quality squid. If you can, get a nice one and try this quick and simple nimono. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 3: Nimono (simmered dish) basics

jc101-nimono2-sm.jpg

This is Lesson 3 of Japanese Cooking 101: The Fundamentals of Washoku. This lesson is about making nimono (煮物) or stewed dishes, while we make a simple stewed or simmered winter vegetable dish. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101: List of fresh ingredients for Lessons 3 and 4

Here are the shopping lists for Lessons 3 and 4 of Japanese Cooking 101. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 2 Bonus: Sushi Rice (Shari) plus Smoked Salmon and Cucumber Chirashizushi

jc101-rice-salmonsushism.jpg

Once you know how to cook perfect Japanese style rice, sushi rice is a snap. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 2: Prep and Cook A Great Bowl of Japanese Rice

jc101-ricebowl1.jpg

A perfectly steamed bowl of plain rice is the unquestioned star of a Japanese meal. And here’s how to cook it, in copious detail - in Lesson 2 of Japanese Cooking 101: The Fundamentals of Washoku. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101: Ingredients and equipment list for Lesson 2

Here’s the list of ingredients and equipment you’ll be needing for Lesson 2 of Japanese Cooking 101. We’ll be tackling the heart of Japanese cooking, rice. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 1-Addendum: Making Miso Soup and Clear Soup with Dashi

jc101-misoshiru5.jpg

Now that you know how to make a proper dashi, you’re 90% on your way to making delicious miso soup and clear soup. If you have ever wondered why your miso soup doesn’t taste quite right, and you were omitting the dashi part…you’re in for a treat! continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 1: How to make dashi stock, the foundation of Japanese cooking

jc101-kombu2.jpg

Welcome to the first lesson of Japanese Cooking 101! Throughout this course I hope to teach you about the foundations of traditional Japanese cooking or washoku, as well as how to cook some Japanese dishes. We’ll start with that most critical of Japanese cooking components, properly made dashi. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101: Fresh ingredient shopping list for Week 1

Here is your fresh ingredient shopping list for the first week of Japanese Cooking 101. continue reading...

filed under

Answering Questions: Sake/mirin redux, bulk buying Japanese rice, and storing Japanese ingredients

Sake and other beverages

Answering Questions is a very sporadic series where I attempt to answer some of the backlog of questions I receive via email, via Facebook, or in comments to unrelated posts, the answers for which may be of interest to a broader audience. I’ve taken out any personal details and so on in the questions. Today I am answering some questions about Japanese ingredients, especially as they relate to the upcoming Japanese Cooking 101 course. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101: List of required ingredients and equipment

Food package from Japan (2)

As promised, here is the list of ingredients and equipment you will need for the Japanese Cooking 101 course. continue reading...

Announcing Japanese Cooking 101: The Fundamentals of Washoku

japanesecooking101.jpg

Announcing a new, free, online course that will teach you the fundamentals of Japanese cooking, conducted right here on JustHungry. Your teacher? Me! continue reading...

Related sites

Share food, change lives
Play Freerice and feed the hungry

Hello!

Just Hungry is a site about Japanese food and home cooking, healthy eating, the expat food life, and more. [log in] or [register]

About this site

maki Just Hungry is a site about food. There are lots of recipes and much more. You may want to read about Just Hungry, or contact the site owner, Makiko Itoh. To dive in real deep, try the site map.

This article is from justhungry.com.