fish

Is sushi "healthy"?

Food model: Sushi (about 500 calories)

More about sushi. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 extra: Fish bone crackers (hone-senbei) with shoestring potatoes

jc101-fish3-iwashihone.jpg

There's no need to throw away the bits of fish that you cut off when you filet them and so forth. Fish bones and heads can be kept for making soup. Or, if the bones are tender enough they can be made into delicious fish-bone crackers.

At the sushi restaurant in New York I worked at many years ago, the chefs used to serve these as extra treats to favored customers. One of those was a lovely little girl, who used to come regularly with her father. She just loved those fish bone crackers. So, one year the chefs made a big batch of them and gave her a takeout box full for her birthday. She was so happy I thought her eyes were going to pop out of her head.

I've paired these with shoestring potatoes, which taste surprisingly sweet next to the umami-rich fish bones. The type of potato is important - choose a nice firm waxy type, not a floury type like Idaho baking potatoes. Alternatively you can use sweet potatoes. continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 extra: Iwashi no Tsumire-jiru (イワシのつみれ汁) - Sardine balls in clear soup

jc101-fish3-iwashitsumire.jpg

Now that you know how to gut, bone and clean sardines, one of the nicest ways to eat the sardines is to turn them into little fish balls which can be floated in a hot pot, pan-fried, and so on - or most classically, served in a clear soup. The ginger and onion takes away any kind of 'fishy' taste. You can even serve this in cold soup for a refreshing change. (Warning: Not many fish guts below but there is a lot of raw fish!) continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 - Fish, Part 3: How to break down small fish

jc101-fish3-iwashi14.jpg

We are entering the home stretch here for both Lesson 5, Fish and the whole Japanese Cooking 101 course. In this lesson we are going to get very intimate with fish.

Warning to the squeamish: If you find up-close photos of raw fish the way nature made them, with guts and stuff, please do not click through.

I’ve put everything ‘below the fold’ here, so if you want to read the rest please click through to the full article on the site. continue reading...

filed under

Fishy interlude: An amazingly detailed model of a Tsukiji market maguro (tuna) by Hobbystock

maguromodel1.jpg

What a beautiful fish! It’s not real though… continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 - Fish, Part 2: Fish buying tips, plus how to "open" a fish

jc101-fish2-cut11.jpg

More fish! In this lesson: How to suss out a good fish shop, how to gauge if a fish is very fresh, plus ‘opening’ up a whole fish. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 5 - Fish, Part 1: Salmon Teriyaki

jc101-salmonsaute6.jpg

We are starting Lesson 5, Fish, with an easy bit of salmon cooking. continue reading...

filed under

Japanese Cooking 101: Lesson 5 theme and ingredients revised to - Fish!

jc101-fishdisplay.jpg

I’ve revised the plans for Lesson 5 of Japanese Cooking 101. We’ll be tackling fish! continue reading...

Japanese Cooking 101, Lesson 3 extra: Nimono without dashi

jc1-1-nimonovar-ikajaga.jpg

Not all nimono dishes need to be made with dashi. If one of the ingredients has plenty of umami on its own, you can make a dashi or broth from it without having to add any more. One such ingredient is squid (ika) or calamari. If you live in an area with a sizeable Italian, Greek or other Mediterranean immigrant population, as well as us Asians, chances are you can get a hold of good quality squid. If you can, get a nice one and try this quick and simple nimono. continue reading...

filed under

Kamaboko, the Star of Year-End and New Year's Feasting

kohaku-kamaboko.jpg

About kamaboko, the humble, rubbery fish cake that is ubiquitous at this time of year, but is also eaten year-round. continue reading...

filed under

Shusse-uo (fish that get promoted) plus yellowtail teriyaki

buri-up.jpg

Fish that get on in life, plus a super-simple recipe for teriyaki fish made in the oven. continue reading...

filed under

Sashimi, raw eggs and more in The Japan Times, plus raw proteins elsewhere

katsuo-sashimi.jpg

This month’s Japan Times article is about all the raw-protein foods that are eaten in Japan, and consuming them safely, plus how to make a great plate of sashimi. More on both topics below. continue reading...

Monday photos: Sanma (pacific saury) is the quintessential fall fish

sanmafresh.jpg

The favorite fish of the fall season in Japan. continue reading...

filed under

Winter fish article in the Japan Times and an evening meal at my mom's

japanese-fish-dinner.jpg

A new article in The Japan Times about winter fish, and how fish fits into a typical Japanese meal. continue reading...

Squid and vegetable ohitashi, plus some Japanese home meals

ika-ninjin.jpg

A simple side dish or salad to serve as part of a Japanese meal, or on its own. Plus, take a look at a couple of real Japanese home meals! continue reading...

filed under

My mother's glazed sardines (Iwashi no kanroni)

iwashi_no_kanroni.jpg

One thing I’m really enjoying here in Japan is cooking simple things at home with my mother. To me, quintessential Japanese home cooking is a dish like this. Sardines, which happen to be quite inexpensive (and sustainable too), are slowly cooked until they are well flavored, meltingly soft, and glossy with a typically Japanese sweet-salty sauce. (The ‘kanroni’ (甘露煮) in the name refers to the method of simmering something in this sweet-salty sauce.) It uses just a few basic ingredients, so please give it a try if you can get a hold of very fresh sardines or similar oily fish. (The fish do have to be very fresh for this to be really good and not-fishy.)

I had a bit of a job working out this recipe, which comes from my mother, since she really doesn’t measure anything when she makes this! After some trial and error, I think these ingredient amounts work well. continue reading...

filed under

Fugu (puffer fish): Would you or wouldn't you?

fugu1.jpg

(Note: Your responses to the question posed below may be translated for a Japanese blog! Read on…)

Even though I’m Japanese, I do think that we eat an awful lot of food that could be considered to be odd. One of them is the infamous fugu, or puffer fish. Fugu’s main claim to fame, besides its extraordinary appearance (it puffs itself up to make itself look a lot bigger to predators), is that its skin and organs are highly poisonous. Nevertheless, it’s considered to be a great delicacy in Japan. It’s now fugu season in fact, so many people are tucking in to fugu sashi (fugu sashimi), fugu nabe (fugu hotpot), and so on. continue reading...

filed under

Mackerel braised in miso sauce (Saba no miso ni)

saba_misoni500.jpg

Here’s another classic Japanese recipe from my mother. I have to admit that I’m not very good with fish, with the exception of simple grilling or panfrying and so on, but my mom has all kinds of great fish recipes up her sleeve.

Last week we spent a rather chilly week in Brittany (Bretagne), where the highlight was definitely the abundance of cheap, really fresh fish available to us. One fish in particular that was really good and inexpensive was maquereau, or Atlantic mackerel, which we know as saba (鯖 さば)in Japanese. In Japan, mackerel is usually treated one of three ways: grilled over an open flame (amiyaki), treated with salt and vinegar (shimesaba) and turned into an old fashioned kind of sushi (sabazushi), or gently braised in a sauce with the classic Japanese combination of salty-sweet flavors. This mackerel is cooked in a ginger scented miso sauce, then allowed to cool down in the liquid overnight, which allows the flavors to penetrate the firm flesh of the fish. You barely notice the oiliness at all, and the sauce is plate-lickingly tasty. I like to eat it chilled, right out of the refrigerator, with plain rice and a simple salad on the side. It makes for a refreshing yet rich dish for a summer meal. continue reading...

filed under

Sweet Potato, Coconut and Shrimp Miso Soup

cocospshsoup.jpg

This rich fusion-esque soup is something I just came up with while fiddling around with the idea of a bisque-like soup without any cream or milk in it. It is fairly frugal despite its richness. continue reading...

filed under

Cod marinated in miso and kochujang

fish_misozuke_500.jpg

I have not featured many fish recipes here on Just Hungry. This is because at the moment I live in a landlocked country, where sea fish must be shipped in, and is expensive to boot. When I do buy some fish, I savor it as a treat. (I may be preparing myself for something that all fish eating people might have to endure soon, given the problems of overfishing.)

This is a classic miso marinade with a spicy twist. Instead of using just miso, I’ve added a little bit of kochujang, spicy Korean bean paste. I’ve used cod for this, but you could use any firm, flaky white fish instead - or even an oily fish such as salmon or swordfish. The pieces of fish should have a certain thickness, so thin fish like flounder won’t do. continue reading...

filed under

Oden, a Japanese stew or hotpot

oden1.jpg

Happy New Year! If you live in Japan, you are probably still in holiday mode. Elsewhere though, chances are you’re back to your normal routine. That’s where I am now - back to work!

I often get requests for various popular Japanese recipes. I keep on thinking I’ve written up so many of them already, until someone asks for one and I think “why didn’t I put that up already?”. One such recipe is for oden, a very popular Japanese stew dish that is especially suited to winter. Traditionaly it’s made in a donabe or pottery pot, but it’s not a requirement to use one. It’s simmered slowly, so is perfect for a crockpot or my favorite for stewing anything, a Le Creuset-type of cast iron enamelled pot.

[adsense:468x60:1:4] continue reading...

filed under

Smoked salmon temari zushi: Ball-shaped sushi

salmontemarizushi1.sidebar.jpg

Following up on the previous recipe for shell shaped sushi, here is another kind of sushi that’s great for parties. Temari are small cloth balls made from leftover scraps of kimono fabric, and temari zushi are meant to look like these colorful toys.

You can make temari zushi with any number of things, such as thinly sliced sashimi grade fish, boiled and butterflied shrimp, thinly sliced and cooked or uncooked vegetables, and even thin slices of cheese. You will likely never see temari zushi at a sushi restaurant - this is homey home-style sushi.

For these, I’ve used thinly cut slices of pale pink smoked salmon, with tiny amount of cream cheese inside, rather in the same vein as a New York Roll - quite non-traditional but it’s a great combination. The key is to make the temari zushi on the small side since they are quite rich. continue reading...

filed under

IMBB 23: Brandade de Morue

filed under

Masterchef challenge, day 15: Fish quenelles in vegetable soup

masterchef_day15.jpg

Day 15 of Masterchef! Here are today's ingredients: continue reading...

filed under

Masterchef challenge, day 13: Grilled Sardine on Avocado and Endive with Momojioroshi

masterchef_day13_1.jpg

It's now week 4! The ingredients for the first day of the 4th round preliminaries were: continue reading...

filed under

Masterchef challenge, day 11: Calamari fritti and roasted red pepper salsa

masterchef_day11.jpg

It's day 11 of MasterChef! The ingredients: continue reading...

filed under

Masterchef challenge day 8: Seared tuna, arugula and basil linguine

masterchef_day8.jpg

It's day 8, and the end of week two of MasterChef. The ingredients were:

  • Tuna steak
  • Fresh basil
  • Fresh (?) linguine
  • Potatoes
  • Olives
  • Parmesan cheese

Potatoes, again! This week potatoes have been in the list every day. I decided to go with the linguine instead - I was missing pasta anyway. continue reading...

filed under

MasterChef challenge, day 6: Not So Classic Fish Pie

masterchef_day5.jpg

The ingredients for this day (day 6 overall, and the second day of the second preliminary round) were: continue reading...

filed under

MasterChef challenge, day 3: A plate of nibbles

masterchef_day3.jpg

The ingredients for Day 3 of the MasterChef preliminaries were: continue reading...

filed under

MasterChef challenge, Day 2: Really Asian Fusion Soup

Masterchef_day2

The ingredients for day 2 of the MasterChef preliminaries were: continue reading...

filed under

mmm, anchovies

I love anchovies. I can't get enough of them. They are the perfect salty flavor enhancer, on pizza, pasta, and so many other things. One of my favorite pizzas is a simple margarita base (that's tomato sauce and mozzarella), with calamata olives and anchovies. continue reading...

filed under

Sushi dane: Tuna

torosashimi.jpg

I wrote this article originally for the Sushisay New York web site. I've edited it a bit for this version.

Tane or dane is the stuff that goes on top of, or inside, sushi rice to make sushi. Sushi dane is very seasonal. Right now, tuna, probably the most popular sushi dane of all, is at its best. continue reading...

filed under

Handrolled sushi

filed under

Fishfinger buttie

I grew up in Japan, England and the U.S., so all the good and bad of the food culture of each country is part of my food vocabulary. While I like to try out new things as much as any enthusiastic cook. "comfort food" to me means things that I used to eat when I was little. continue reading...

filed under

Related sites

Share food, change lives
Play Freerice and feed the hungry

Hello!

Just Hungry is a site about Japanese food and home cooking, healthy eating, the expat food life, and more. [log in] or [register]

About this site

maki Just Hungry is a site about food. There are lots of recipes and much more. You may want to read about Just Hungry, or contact the site owner, Makiko Itoh. To dive in real deep, try the site map.

This article is from justhungry.com.