IMG: Chicken karaage - gfree

A gluten and soy-free version of a classic fried chicken recipe, that's just as tasty as the original.


This month's Japan Times column is about the basics of nabe, or hot pots that are usually cooked at the table, with everyone taking what they like from the pot as it cooks.

Japanese kids' favorite foods ranking

What do Japanese kids like to eat? The answer may surprise you.


Eggs, plus the history of ranking restaurants and food in Japan.


About the difference between kanten and agar, plus cool, slippery glassy noodles.


Did you know that mirin used to a a high class, expensive beverage rather than a cooking ingredient?

Yuzu-cha (yuzu tea)

Catching up on various things, plus a not-really-a-recipe for yuzu tea or yuzu-cha.


Japanese cuisine is now a UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage.

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Japanese Cooking 101: Final thoughts, or what was the point?

I'm still getting reactions to the recently completed Japanese Cooking 101 course (if you missed it, here's the complete list of lessons.) While the reactions have been overwhelming positive, I've gotten a couple of negative comments too.

One I wanted to address in particular is the accusation, if you will, that the lessons do not represent that way most people cook in Japan anymore.


Shiraae (白和え)

There are several Japanese recipes that I take so much for granted that I'm sure I've uploaded to this site already...but I haven't. Shira-ae or shiraae, a classic tofu paste that was born from the Zen Buddhist vegetarian cuisine called shojin ryouri, is one such recipe.

It's often described as a 'dressing', but that doesn't adequately describe its thick, rich texture. It's usually mixed with various shredded vegetables, but there's nothing stopping you from mixing it with poached and shredded chicken, or ham, or toasted pine nuts, or anything you like. The rich taste comes from ground sesame seeds and a touch of miso. The key to the texture is to drain the tofu very well.

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